Construction Job Site Personal Safety Rules

My company is an Architectural firm, and we are in the process of preparing a policy regarding job site personal safety for our employees who will be visiting construction sites.  Part of this policy is prescribing the minimum protective equipment they are to wear while on the job site (hard hat, hard sole shoes, safety glasses, ear protection and high-visibility vests), in addition to advising them of the need to adhere to the Contractor's safety regulations (which they will be briefed on at the beginning of projects' construction) and being mindful of potential hazards.  In the policy we are careful to note that the personal safety requirements cannot cover all instances in which they may be exposed to potential hazards, and that it's their responsibility to be prudent in their actions on the job site.

Any words to the wise regarding the pitfalls of such a policy?  What to include and not to include?

Thanks.

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  • TXHRGuyTXHRGuy 1,586 Posts
    edited August 2015 PMVote Up0Vote Down
    My company is an Architectural firm, and we are in the process of preparing a policy regarding job site personal safety for our employees who will be visiting construction sites.  Part of this policy is prescribing the minimum protective equipment they are to wear while on the job site (hard hat, hard sole shoes, safety glasses, ear protection and high-visibility vests), in addition to advising them of the need to adhere to the Contractor's safety regulations (which they will be briefed on at the beginning of projects' construction) and being mindful of potential hazards.  In the policy we are careful to note that the personal safety requirements cannot cover all instances in which they may be exposed to potential hazards, and that it's their responsibility to be prudent in their actions on the job site.

    Any words to the wise regarding the pitfalls of such a policy?  What to include and not to include?

    Thanks.

    Consult counsel.  I doubt you can simply tell your employees they are on their own on all safety matters unanticipated in your policy and have that get you out of any liability.

  • The best thing you can do is train your employees about hazards in the workplace.  Give them training in hazard identification and hazard recognition.  Give them training in fall protection, PPE, and other related safety topics.  Make sure you document every bit of it, though.  No documentation means it didn't happen.  [:P]

    -Justin

  • Another thing to consider is who is providing the personal protective equipment.  If you are requiring it as part of the job, I believe you have to supply it.
  • True statement.  Employers must provide required PPE at no cost to the employee.  Any additional PPE that the employee may WANT has to be bought externally (unless the employer is rather generous).  I have a list of exceptions to the rule if anyone is interested.

    -Justin

  • While we're at it, probably the most overlooked bits of training for people who don't deal with it every day are confined spaces and lock-out/tag-out.  Of course, time and money are limited and the most likely screw ups come from breach of common sense.  I've been shocked by where people will stick their hands in a heavy manufacturing environment and the stuff in construction is often worse because it doesn't always move the same way every time.

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